Archive for the 'Innovation and Creativity' Category

Weird things people do

walking-asciiAs a reader of this and my other blogs, you know one of the underlying concepts of Exponential Mindset Thinking is what I call antimimeticisomorphism.

Today’s post is about some weird things successful people do, Based on a Scientific American Magazine article, among many interesting facts, reveals that Dean Kamen, known for the invention of the Segway, dresses almost exclusively in denim. He spent five years in college before dropping out, does not take vacations and has never married. Kamen presides (along with his Ministers of Ice Cream, Brunch and Nepotism) over the Connecticut island kingdom of North Dumpling, which has “seceded” from the U.S. and dispenses its own currency in units of pi. Visitors are issued a visa form that includes spaces on which to note identifying marks on both their face and buttocks.

Kamen, who works tirelessly at inspiring kids to pursue careers in science and engineering, is one of many highly creative people whose personal behavior sometimes strikes others as odd. Albert Einstein picked up cigarette butts off the street to get tobacco for his pipe; Howard Hughes spent entire days on a chair in the middle of the supposedly germ-free zone of his Beverly Hills Hotel suite; the composer Robert Schumann believed that his musical compositions were dictated to him by Beethoven and other deceased luminaries from their tombs; and Charles Dickens is said to have fended off imaginary urchins with his umbrella as he walked the streets of London. More recently, we have seen Michael Jackson’s preoccupation with rhinoplasty, Salvador Dalí’s affection for dangerous pets and the Icelandic singer Björk dressed for the Oscars as a swan.

I am not advocating you be “this different”, but then again if it works to create extra-ordinary results, why not?!?!

Our approach to business coaching and mentoring is far from standard… but not totally off the charts. Just enough to create results that astonish and surprise…

John Cleese’s Creativity Suggestions

Cleese Creativity, Innovation, Creative ThinkingAs a reader or subscriber to this blog, you’ve come to expect the unexpected, which is why you’re here right now, reading this.

One of the foundational concept of Exponential Internet Marketing that we teach our clients is how to improve SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) by blogging.

Today’s post is a prime example. It was sent to me by Brian Matthews of Axis Planning. He came across a great article on creativity by the legendary John Cleese. I have to admit, it’s brilliant in its simplicity and elegance. It reflects several recent books I’ve been reading on cognition and accelerated learning techniques.

What Brian has done is create user-generated content. Easier said than done. It takes most people YEARS before anyone generates content for them. I teach my clients how to do it in DAYS and WEEKS… Click on the hyperlinks above to learn more about how we do that, but before you do, this blog post encapsulates half a dozen SEO strategies that can help you generate more leads for your business – contact us and we’ll show you how it’s done – using legitimate strategies that are GUARANTEED to work.

Stockholm Presentation

Now this sure beats a Powerpoint Presentation!

Thank you to Peter Wilson of Oz Cakes for forwarding it to me!

A picture is worth a 1000 words

I’ve recently blogged about the importance of your online photo and image. We’ve all heard the dictum a picture is worth a thousand words. In this instance it’s 2,000.

It always amazes me what the power of the human spirit can unleash when it’s creativity is unbounded. For more images like this one, click on the photo below!

Photos composed of words, Words In Photos, Portraits With Words

Engineers And Antimimeticisomorphism

Highway Goes Through Building In Japan

Highway Goes Through Building In Japan

Gate Tower Building is a 16-story office building in, Osaka , Japan . And what makes it notable is the highway that passes through the 5th-7th floors of this building. The highway is part of the Hanshin Expressway, a network (239.3 km) of expressways surrounding Osaka , Kobe and Kyoto , Japan . The Gate Tower Building is Japan ‘s first building to have a highway pass through it. And it had been nicknamed “beehive” referring to its appearance as a “bustling place”. The Umeda Exit of the Ikeda Route of the Hanshin Expressway system passes through this building.

The expressway is the tenant of these floors. The elevator doesn’t stop on floor 5th-7th, floor 4 being followed by floor 8. These floors consist of elevators, stairways, machinery and other stuff. The highway passes through the building as a bridge, held up by supports next to the building making no contact with the building itself. The building has a double core construction, with a circular cross section and special care is taken by providing surrounded structure to the highway to protect the building from noise and vibration. Generally expressways are built underground, and passing through a building is an extremely rare occasion. It dates back to 1983, when the redevelopment of this area was decided upon, “building permits were refused because the highway was already being planned to be built over this land. The property rights’ holders refused to give up, and negotiated with the Hanshin Expressway corporation for approximately 5 years to reach the current solution.”

Click on the hyperlink to see more photos of this amazing building on my Antimimeticisomorphism site. Once you get there, click on COOL PHOTOS and then HIGHWAY – sorry, this site does not have standard URL navigation.

Australian Engineers losing their skills?

Australia’s intelligence is dropping. Not the general intelligence, but a specialised type of intelligence that is essential for Australia’s economic and general prosperity.

It’s a drop in the natural and intuitive comprehension of technical systems. For years it has been implicitly assumed by educators that engineering students have this comprehension. Even though this is really no longer the case, there has been no major change in the education (primary, secondary and tertiary) system to compensate.

To many of us, this might not seem like a major issue. However, without well-trained engineers (and other technologists), Australia won’t be in a position to develop the new technologies that make it easier, faster and cheaper to do things. When it becomes easier to do anything (travelling through a city, making a product, building a house or sending information electronically, for example), it naturally becomes more affordable.

And those who know how to make it easier not only improve the wealth of society, but are soon in a financially better situation themselves. The value of engineering – and its effective education – to a country is obvious once you think about it.

Nevertheless, because of the drop in the average comprehension of technical systems within our society and no effort to account for it, we cannot hope to produce the quality of engineers that we once did.

This started more than a decade ago.  Clint Steele recalls a lecturer of his about to use a component of a car to explain a phenomenon, but then catching himself and making the comment that ”students don’t work on their cars the way they used to”.

It is harder these days to work on your car or to fix your appliances or garden equipment. These days things just aren’t made to be repaired.

Obviously, the typical exposure to the inner workings of technology that the average Australian can expect growing up is reducing.

In his article, Mr Steele reveals a division where the cars are made of paper. Their design is remarkable, but because the students build the car by simply putting the parts together, they gain insufficient technical expertise of how the car was actually engineered. In other words, they gain less technical aptitude because they are removed from the creative process of engineering.

Without exposure to technology and how it works, young Australians will neither develop an interest that will motivate them to pursue a related career or develop an intuitive understanding that will let us develop the excellent engineers that are so vital to Australia’s future.

For some time, we relied on country students (who gained the required insight from working on farm equipment) and the rare students who maintained an interest in Lego or Meccano to an age that some would consider unhealthy. But these students are becoming rarer.

This reduced interest means students don’t consider engineering until later in high school, and often don’t take the ideal subjects in their final years (physics, chemistry and mathematics). The result is that the entry standards for engineering courses are reduced, and exacerbate the problems already mentioned.

Teaching technical skills in engineering degrees is too late; without the early interest in technology, students just won’t develop the interest and motivation that will encourage them to select the ideal subjects for an engineering degree, let alone the intuition essential for excellent engineers.

If we don’t take this aspect of education just as seriously, Australia will struggle to remain competitive.

That’s why my blogs, programs and events are so vital for engineers to consider – to maintain and further develop the highly sought after skills that employers are willing to pay a premium for.

3 Quick productivity tips

Productivity Tip #1

When traveling, test traveling at different times of the day to test and determine which one is MOST productive and efficient for you. Contrary to popular practice, taking an early flight (when you have the option not to) is not the most productive option – especially if you sleep on the flight. Also, you want to consider traffic to and from the airports and coordination considerations. I now travel more often at midday – avoiding traffic as well as getting things done prior to the flight, being wide awake and working on the flight and then picking up loose ends when I arrive at my destination. It’s all about “Perfect Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.”

Productivity Tip #2

Upgrade your hotel room and/or pick a different hotel or apartment when traveling to familiar cities. You’d be amazed at how different each choice can be. I vary my hotel selections from trip to trip for variety as well as based on what I am doing. If I am meeting with several clients, I will rent a 2-bedroom suite or apartment so that I can have visitors in a comfortable environment. The point is TEST the options – sometimes an upgrade is less expensive than hiring a separate boardroom.

Productivity Tip #3

This one’s a personal favorite of mine, it’s been called time shifting – recording your favorite TV shows or sports and watching them without commercial interruptions (saving you time) when it’s convenient for you. With Tivo and Digital Video Recorders, there is no excuse not to do it. I simply will not watch live TV anymore. If it’s sports, I’ll start to watch it 15 to 30 minutes after it starts and “chase play” through the commercials. I simply cannot afford waste associated with commercials.

I am not the only one doing this – the entire world has embraced time shifting. All it takes is the foresight to plan ahead and make the commitment to stick with it. Trust me, once you start, you will never go back.

These productivity tips are important because we all have the same amount of time – 24 hours in our day. The difference between successful people and less successful people is their use and leverage of time.

The more productive you can be, the more time you gain to do what you really, really enjoy.

Engineers As Artists?!?!?

Ray Keefe of Successful Endeavours in Melbourne blogged about an Engineer who is also an artist. Is that even possible? Check it out and to see more examples, go to www.Antimimeticisomorphism.info, select Cool Photos and scroll down the page to PCB Boards Recycling.

Engineer Explains The Economy?

Today’s post is from a new book I’m reading… It’s so valuable, I’m keeping the title secret for my most trusted clients – to make sure they stay ahead of their competitors… But there was something in it I wanted to share with you since we’ve been focusing on engineers this year, making sure they develop their business skills and aptitudes to succeed in their businesses and/or careers. It’s about an engineer, Bill Phillips who came up with the MONIAC (Monetary National Income Analogue Computer) also known as the Phillips Hydraulic Computer and the Financephalograph, in 1949.

It models the national economic processes of the United Kingdom, while Phillips was a student at the London School of Economics (LSE), The MONIAC was an analogue computer which used fluidic logic to model the workings of an economy. The MONIAC name may have been suggested by an association of money and ENIAC, an early electronic digital computer.

The reason I’m posting this is to show you that as a professional engineer, you need to get access to stuff like this to realise that your talents, skills, abilities and aptitudes have their use in a wide variety of situations. As The Exponential Growth Strategist, that’s what I do for my clients – I teach them to THINK DIFFERENTLY. I’ve designed special courses just for engineers to make sure they learn how to leverage their superior analytical skills to their advantage in their business, projects and/or careers.

Here is the first video that introduces the Moniac.

This second video explains it in more detail…
Continue reading ‘Engineer Explains The Economy?’